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View Full Version : Salling at Anchor - Comments on this method of reducing it



jmunro123
01-11-2011, 01:39 AM
Its late and I can't sleep and was wondering about how to reduce 'sailing' at anchor. I know there has been lots written and commented on this here at CSR, but I came across another method that I think would work very well.

http://www.ventanasvoyage.com/anchor_bridle.htm

or this description

http://www.fishingmonthly.com.au/Articles/Display/7924-AVOID-YAWING--HOW-TO-BRIDLE-YOUR-BOAT


Basically tie a line from the stern to the anchor line/chain at the bow. Then let the anchor line out a bit to create a triangle. The boat will 'sail' but will stop in one spot and just stay there and the Yaw would be gone. That one makes sense and is easy to build. A line lenght from the rear cleat to a shackle that attached to the anchor chain.

I am thinking of this method for anchoring in a bay while in the North Channel next summer. Sometimes the anchorages get a little crowded and this would make the boat position more predictable.

So - I was looking to see if anyone had an opinion about this method.

katricol
01-11-2011, 07:25 AM
this looks fine to me, just not in bad conditions like the author states.

Carver370
01-11-2011, 08:49 AM
I know some people who will just throw a 5 gallon bucket off the transom with a line tied to it and it seems to keep them from sailing around in moderate conditions.

wetpaint
01-11-2011, 08:59 AM
Depends on anchorage...If all boats are swinging in tight anchorage, you will have to do the same.....If I am in a shallow private cove, i will just throw a stern anchor

trit21
01-11-2011, 09:27 AM
You can also tie the anchor to a side bow cleat to minimize the swinging at anchor. As wetpaint mentioned, don't piss off you neighbors if they swing and you don't. Everyone in the anchorage should follow the same anchor technique as the first boat that is anchored there.

Alex F
01-11-2011, 11:36 AM
I take it that we're under the assumption that there's plenty of room in the anchorage area. I've used the stern anchor method, but this type of bridle might be a little easier. However, I think it's much easier if you have all chain. Otherwise, it might be necessary to use something like a ring type to maintain the triangle. I didn't like the plastic part they show on the 2nd link.

We should also consider that there's a big difference between stern anchor method vs this bridle, which is the added pressure for the anchor. So, just like they say, it's necessary to add extra scope. This of course will require more swinging room.

On the positive side, the bridle method adds convenience and could be deployed single handed.

I got to look in to it next season.

Tonka Boater
01-11-2011, 11:41 AM
Gary had a detailed post about anchor bridles with diagrams. Maybe he can chime in and post the link.

Alex F
01-11-2011, 12:05 PM
Gary had a detailed post about anchor bridles with diagrams. Maybe he can chime in and post the link.

This thread has slightly different agenda, although on related topic.

The goal is to prevent the boat from rocking side to side when the wind and the waves are coming from different directions. I'm sure many of us experienced this on number of occasions and it's not much fun. In this case something has to be done if you don't want your crew to get seasick.

As I recall, Gary's thread was to prevent from boat swinging while properly positioned in to the wind while anchored. Some, if not most, models just have way too much swing. So, this is where Gary's solution will help.

Here're couple of links:

http://clubsearay.com/forum/showthread.php?t=15178&highlight=windlass

http://clubsearay.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26408&page=4

jmunro123
01-11-2011, 01:16 PM
This thread has slightly different agenda, although on related topic.

The goal is to prevent the boat from rocking side to side when the wind and the waves are coming from different directions. I'm sure many of us experienced this on number of occasions and it's not much fun. In this case something has to be done if you don't want your crew to get seasick.

As I recall, Gary's thread was to prevent from boat swinging while properly positioned in to the wind while anchored. Some, if not most, models just have way too much swing. So, this is where Gary's solution will help.

Here're couple of links:

http://clubsearay.com/forum/showthread.php?t=15178&highlight=windlass

http://clubsearay.com/forum/showthread.php?t=26408&page=4


I also read those a while ago - but I was thinking this idea would totally stop it. I have been in anchorages with a three point bridle and they still seem to swing however not as much as without. But this system I think would stop it totally. The other benefit is you could move the boat port or starboard by adjusting the lenght of the lines. Say a boat anchors after you and you think he is to close. With this setup you could adjust the lines and move your boat sidways a bit. I will try it and report back. Well after the ice melts.

Alex F
01-11-2011, 01:38 PM
As far as I know, bridle helps to minimize the swing, but doesn't stop it completely. To stop swinging I’d say you’ll need to drop a 2nd anchor, either from the stern or Bahamian style from the bow.

Anyway, I thought that you had a different idea with this thread.

electricaldoctor
01-11-2011, 02:27 PM
Sometimes, we will raft up for an overnighter with three boats in a calm bay. We will have the two outside boats set out their front anchors and we will set two stern anchors out from the same two outside boats.

In lieu of deploying any stern anchors, how would we configure the triangle rope method when multiple boats are involved? :huh: :huh:

Sea Wolff
01-11-2011, 02:37 PM
I recall reading in a book all about anchoring - don't have the exact title handy, book is on the boat, and I am not:smt089

The author mentioned that when entering an area where boats are already anchored that subsequent boats should, due to legal reasons, anchor in the same manner,which makes sense. If no one else has a stern anchor out and subsequent boats put out a stern anchor, when the tide or wind shifts all the boats without the stern anchor will shift and could hit boats with a stern and bow anchor deployed.

Of course if you are by yourself, the method you describe may be worth a try.

I am not a lawyer this is not legal advice :)

Iprof
01-11-2011, 03:23 PM
Its late and I can't sleep and was wondering about how to reduce 'sailing' at anchor. I know there has been lots written and commented on this here at CSR, but I came across another method that I think would work very well.

http://www.ventanasvoyage.com/anchor_bridle.htm

or this description

http://www.fishingmonthly.com.au/Articles/Display/7924-AVOID-YAWING--HOW-TO-BRIDLE-YOUR-BOAT


Basically tie a line from the stern to the anchor line/chain at the bow. Then let the anchor line out a bit to create a triangle. The boat will 'sail' but will stop in one spot and just stay there and the Yaw would be gone. That one makes sense and is easy to build. A line lenght from the rear cleat to a shackle that attached to the anchor chain.

I am thinking of this method for anchoring in a bay while in the North Channel next summer. Sometimes the anchorages get a little crowded and this would make the boat position more predictable.

So - I was looking to see if anyone had an opinion about this method.

I have to ask you first were you in the North Channel this summer in late July with 2 PWC. I took some pictures from the top of Covered Portage Cove of a boat just like yours.

I have been going to the North Channel and anchoring out for the past 5 years. Last summer 7 weeks only 6 nights at a dock, the summer before 6 weeks and 6 nights at a dock, we love to anchor out. I always set my anchor watch and turn the track on at night, this records the distance. This one night was rather windy we slept good as I knew we had the right amount of rode out and a good hold, in the morning the track read we had gone 105 miles, yes 105 miles. The track showed a horseshoe of a solid line with one line straight out from the horseshoe that went to where the anchor was. We sure were moving to cover that distance but didn't feel it. I have 100 feet of chain and 100 feet of rope and a bridle. I drop the anchor and let it set and then attach my bridle and let out more chain, enough to have about 5 feet laying on the ground. If I am in 5 feet of water I have about 25 feet of chain off the bridle and have about 35 feet going to the anchor. The chain for the bridle is a lot of weight and with the chain dragging in the mud it slows the movement of the boat down. I have seen us not move in an anchorage while other boats have moved a lot and boats with rope for rode are all over the place.

Ken

jmunro123
01-11-2011, 03:50 PM
I have to ask you first were you in the North Channel this summer in late July with 2 PWC. I took some pictures from the top of Covered Portage Cove of a boat just like yours.

I have been going to the North Channel and anchoring out for the past 5 years. Last summer 7 weeks only 6 nights at a dock, the summer before 6 weeks and 6 nights at a dock, we love to anchor out. I always set my anchor watch and turn the track on at night, this records the distance. This one night was rather windy we slept good as I knew we had the right amount of rode out and a good hold, in the morning the track read we had gone 105 miles, yes 105 miles. The track showed a horseshoe of a solid line with one line straight out from the horseshoe that went to where the anchor was. We sure were moving to cover that distance but didn't feel it. I have 100 feet of chain and 100 feet of rope and a bridle. I drop the anchor and let it set and then attach my bridle and let out more chain, enough to have about 5 feet laying on the ground. If I am in 5 feet of water I have about 25 feet of chain off the bridle and have about 35 feet going to the anchor. The chain for the bridle is a lot of weight and with the chain dragging in the mud it slows the movement of the boat down. I have seen us not move in an anchorage while other boats have moved a lot and boats with rope for rode are all over the place.

Ken

Ken - That is funny - yes we were in Covered Portage between July 26 - July 30th. Not every night. A friend of our met us at Killarney and stayed at the newly renovated Sportsman Inn and brought his jetskis. We have a red 2006 Sea Doo Wake Edition and he has a few jetskis. one is yellow, one is green and i think the other one is red. I will PM you my email address, can you send me a copy of the picture?

Iprof
01-11-2011, 05:31 PM
Ken - That is funny - yes we were in Covered Portage between July 26 - July 30th. Not every night. A friend of our met us at Killarney and stayed at the newly renovated Sportsman Inn and brought his jetskis. We have a red 2006 Sea Doo Wake Edition and he has a few jetskis. one is yellow, one is green and i think the other one is red. I will PM you my email address, can you send me a copy of the picture?

I sent you the pictures, yes it is you and the PWC's.

Small world.

Ken

techmitch
01-11-2011, 05:48 PM
It's winter, and you guy's are hoarding pics?

Iprof
01-11-2011, 08:44 PM
It's winter, and you guy's are hoarding pics?

I don't want to see all of you on Club Sea Ray showing up in Paradise. :thumbsup:

Ken

jmunro123
01-11-2011, 09:00 PM
I don't want to see all of you on Club Sea Ray showing up in Paradise. :thumbsup:

Ken


Ken - that picture shows exactly what I am talking about. Our boat is pointed about 45 degrees to starboard from basically everyone else at anchor.

Also - now the secret s out. That is one of the best and most beautiful anchorage in the North Channel and a must see for anyone going there. Its about 3 miles west of Killarney.

techmitch
01-11-2011, 09:14 PM
Looks beautiful, thanks for sharing