30 plus Sea Ray loading and unloading from a trailer

Discussion in 'Trailering' started by Jaxmike, Jul 15, 2019.

  1. Jaxmike

    Jaxmike New Member

    2
    Jul 15, 2019
    290 amberjack 2001,
    5.7 Mercruiaer w/ Bravo III outdrives
    Like some info from experienced sea ray owner that trailer their 30 plus boat and loading and unloading from a trailer
     
  2. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    What kind of info are you looking for? Essentially, it's the same idea as a smaller boat. But a 30-footer is nowhere near big enough to worry about - as long as you have a properly setup trailer it's pretty straight forward. What IS different is that the boat's beam is wider than what is legally permitted in most (if not all?) states... and there are sometimes some stipulations on when you can trailer it based on day of the week and/or time of day and possibly a permit is needed. You'll need to contact your state's permitting dep't for a wide load permit - and all states that you pass through, if needed.
     
  3. SCORPIO

    SCORPIO Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Apr 7, 2008
    Delaware
    1989 300 DA
    Twin 5.7 Merc Alpha I
    I usually launch at high tide so I dont have to back in as far with bunk trailer. I put wheel chocks under truck tires just in case. Otherwise, it just floats off and I park the trailer.
     
  4. Sundancer

    Sundancer Active Member

    Jul 20, 2005
    Prosser, WA
    30 year old CLASSIC 300 DA, towed almost anywhere behind the Duramax Duallie Crew Cab.
    16 cyl, 700 cu. in./Alpha I's
    I don't find that it's any harder to unload than any other boat I've owned. Loading isn't any different either. After you have loaded it a few times, you will get the hang of it assuming the trailer is set up right. I have a two speed crank so it's a few more turns vs. a smaller boat, but I often beat smaller boat out of the water. I take more time once it's on the trailer to load the wide load sign and flags. Down the road you get used to looking for signs, trees or other hazards that an 11 foot wide, 12' 6" high load might hit. I keep the boat at home and prefer that to a slip because I'd HATE going to the same place every week. Just got back from Lake Pend Oreille, Lake Coeur d'Alene and Priest Lake in Northern Idaho the last two weeks. The San Juan's are another destination we hit as well.
     

Share This Page

Show Sidebar