Question from a newb!

Discussion in 'Sport Cruisers' started by rh320, Mar 3, 2018.

  1. CliffA

    CliffA Well-Known Member

    Dec 29, 2009
    Lake Norman, NC
    2001 Sea Ray 340DA
    Name: 'Happy Place'
    4.5kW West. Generator
    Purchased Nov. 2014
    Fresh Water Use
    Twin Merc. 6.2L (MPI)
    640 hp (Total)
    Raw Water Cooled
    V-Drive Transmissions

    I tend to agree...if things get too 'regimented' it kind of sucks some of the fun out of the adventure....I don't want me nor my guest to be so uptight they can't sit back, enjoy their cocktails, and have a good time.....

    again common sense and good judgment have to be used.....I find that when someone new to boating goes on a cruise on my boat they almost always simply ask if they have questions about things like how to use the head if they are unfamiliar with that....

    safety is DEFINETLY priority one so tell and show the guest where the life jackets and throw cushion and fire extinguisher are located before leaving the dock and then sit back and enjoy the ride.....

    as the captain if your are going to make a maneuver with the boat that could cause someone to loose their balance or pose some other threat to them then we should announce that maneuver in advance and what the affected guest should expect....(of course emergency maneuvers are a different thing)....

    99.9% of the time our cruises are at slow speed....I have found that almost every guest on our boat prefers a slow speed cruise over getting up on plane because they can talk normally to each other and not have to worry so much about being bounced around if they need to move around the boat.....

    we cruise on an inland lake...cruising out in open water as in ocean cruising may be a whole different animal which does call for some higher level of training for guest....

    just my $.02 worth....

    cliff
     
    potis likes this.
  2. JVM225

    JVM225 Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Apr 8, 2008
    Farmingdale, NY
    2002 410 Sundancer, Monaco Edition.
    3126 Cats.
    Or, hopefully he’s smart enough to stay single for a few more years so he gets a chance to .......ummm.......ahhhh...interview many potential candidates for the first mate position on his 320.
     
  3. JVM225

    JVM225 Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Apr 8, 2008
    Farmingdale, NY
    2002 410 Sundancer, Monaco Edition.
    3126 Cats.
    My favorite kind of guest!
     
  4. JVM225

    JVM225 Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Apr 8, 2008
    Farmingdale, NY
    2002 410 Sundancer, Monaco Edition.
    3126 Cats.
    Routines and checklists seem lengthy or involved but they really aren’t.
    The key is to get to the point where they are good habits and they go quickly.
    Boating first and foremost should be fun for everyone on the boat.
    Good habits keep it that way.
     
  5. BillK2632

    BillK2632 Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Jun 25, 2009
    Lake Norman, NC
    1999 185 Bowrider,
    Mercruiser 4.3, Alpha I
    Like I mentioned above, when I am the captain, well, I'm the captain, but when I am a guest I'm not the captain, so I just try and enjoy myself. If I can help and they want me too, great, if not that's fine too. It's nice to just ride on someone else's boat and not have to worry about running it - especially in a sailboat, there is a little more going on than on a power boat. I do like to make sure the captain is aware of the status of certain critical systems - like the cooler and the head.
     
  6. rh320

    rh320 Member

    119
    Mar 2, 2018
    Boatless
    Boatless
    We'll see! Kinda happy with exactly the way life is right now though haha
     
  7. rh320

    rh320 Member

    119
    Mar 2, 2018
    Boatless
    Boatless
    I love the bay and I'm ready to explore a lot more parts of it. Ive spent almost all of life jet skiing and boating the upper bay. My parents have had multiple bowriders throughout the decades and I've been operating them since I was old enough to do so. I have a ton of experience docking. We go to dockbars for seafood every time we take it out so boating, docking and close quarter maneuvering is nothing new to me. I've even operated larger boats before as well but that was under the watchful eye of its owner and I never docked it so while I do have a lot of experience Im very new to this style of boating.

    I will be picking up new dock lines soon and I will definitely get 2 sets!
     
  8. rh320

    rh320 Member

    119
    Mar 2, 2018
    Boatless
    Boatless
    Yeah, I always remember from boating with my parents when I was younger that their friends always wanted to help but my dad would always politely decline and say that its just easier and actually goes faster if my dad and I just stick to our regular routine!
     
  9. rh320

    rh320 Member

    119
    Mar 2, 2018
    Boatless
    Boatless

    I enjoyed reading your reply!

    I'm very good at following a routine and I get a lot of satisfaction from that. Ive always liked taking charge of situations and directing too. Probably the reason why I run 2 business, one of which I own and am about to start another! But I always hated when someone would interrupt my process on my parents boat growing up. My parents were great with giving me responsibility and letting me take charge. I eventually pretty much took over their last boat! I think they enjoyed not having to stress over anything and having someone else captain them around.
    I actually am really looking forward to developing a checklist and a plan. I will be including safety stuff to that as well!

    Luckily for me I'm not new to boating whatsoever. I grew up on the Bay and so a lot of my friends have with me as well. I have two friends who have done a lot of boating with me and one married into a big boating family so I think I will be in good shape with their help eventually. I will probably pay for one of them to take classes with me at the Annapolis School of Seamanship and join me when I have a captain for the day.
     
  10. rh320

    rh320 Member

    119
    Mar 2, 2018
    Boatless
    Boatless

    I have a lot of experience boating with absolutely no formal training. Decades on the Bay. I definitely am not over-concerned here. I still have a ton to learn and Ive come to realize that the average boat owner you mention might have no business owning a boat. They seem to have no idea how to properly take care of one (I've seen more boats in a worse condition than Ive seen in a better condition), they have no idea how to properly operate one (Ive watched many a boats slam into piers, fuel docks, other boats in slips), and they have no idea how to properly navigate the waterways. Im generally more shocked by what I see than impressed each weekend I go out.

    But, I am extremely inquisitive and I absolutely love learning. I have a strong desire to know everything and be the best at whatever I do. Now that I am moving into a much different and more serious style of boating, I can't help but think of all the things I don't know and naturally I ask a lot of questions to learn more and improve.

    And of course who the freaking hell doesn't love talking boats and boating!!

    Your #2 tenant of safe boating is probably the most common thing I've said to newbies Ive taken out on smaller boats over the years. I repeat that to myself every time I enter a fairway heading towards a slip! I'll never forget or get to good for that one!!
     
  11. Stee6043

    Stee6043 Well-Known Member

    Jun 1, 2015
    West Michigan
    1997 Sundancer 400
    7.4L Gassers
    I wouldn't want to boat where you boat! The idiot boater is not the average boater in my neck of the woods. On a super busy drunk weekend maybe the idiots number 1 in 10 on the high side. But if we're being honest with ourselves (at least up here on the Great Lakes) the boater you describe is not the average owner/operator. There are 100 boaters out there doing just fine for every 1 that slams the piers, blows the fuel dock and has the usual assortment of "real" trouble.

    I'm not trying to argue against the aforementioned level of attention to detail. I just think if we have to try this hard to go pleasure boating...we might be missing the point.
     
    Curtis likes this.
  12. rh320

    rh320 Member

    119
    Mar 2, 2018
    Boatless
    Boatless
    Potential first mate interviews might be the reason why the boat is staying at 350 slip resort marina with a tiki bar on the beach, restaurant, golf course, gym...
     
    Curtis likes this.
  13. Curtis

    Curtis Member

    63
    Feb 6, 2013
    San Antonio, Texas
    320 Sundancer 2004
    Previous 280 Sundancer
    Twin 8.1 (496 Mags) w Bravo III drives
    I personally don’t use a checklist but I believe they are a fantastic idea for somebody new to a boat, boat size, or boat type.
     
  14. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    After a while the checklist become part of your normal routine - kind of like muscle memory. Then the checklists become necessary for trip planning and not the daily outings. It really annoying (not to mention expensive) to realize you forgot something when you are 2 hours from your home port with no easy access back.

    I apply this with my high school kids that play hockey. We have our checklist for equipment, etc - no big deal if your missing something at a local practice - but you have better checked and confirmed the list before leaving on a 6 hour drive (or even the 30 minute drive as we can't get home and back before the game start when your missing something at the rink).

    -Kevin
     
  15. JVM225

    JVM225 Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Apr 8, 2008
    Farmingdale, NY
    2002 410 Sundancer, Monaco Edition.
    3126 Cats.
    You’re a lucky guy!
    Majority of boaters around here have no clue about what they’re doing. Can be very nerve wracking and a big reason why a few people I know have gotten out of boating.
    I try to go out during the times when the least amount of people are on the water and it’s easier to give the knuckleheads a wide berth.
    We got to out favorite anchorage early before it gets crowded and leave later after it clears out to avoid problems. Almost never have a day on the hook where I don’t come close to having someone run over my anchor line, anchor too close and risk swinging in to me when the wind changes, or drift in to me after not setting their anchor properly and indulging in adult beverages.
    Knucklehead of the year winner last summer:
    Guy in a 34 Silverton drops the hook a few hundred feet in front of me, later that afternoon the wind picks up a bit and his anchor doesn’t hold, the 34 Silverton is bearing down on my port bow. I lean on my horn. The guy is swimming with his wife and kids after the Silverton. He gets up on the swim platform as he narrowly misses me. He gets up on his flybridge and is trying to start the motors as his wife and kids are trying to catch up with the drifting boat so they can get on too. He gets a motor started just in time to wrap another anchored boat’s anchor line around a prop.
    Those kiddies learned some new curse words that day......but luckily they all got back aboard with all their limbs in tact.
     
  16. Dave Anton

    Dave Anton Guest

    Awesome!
     

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