Generator for 2007 Sundancer 240

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I was on the St Croix River over the 4th of July and took a video of almost 100 boats all lined up on the beach. 1/2-3/4 of the boats had generators running on their swim platforms. I didn’t hear about anybody dying
 
Eclectic motors in general need a factor of 3 times the generator to start. Each of our AC units require 10 AMPs so it needs a generator that puts out 30 AMPS. We have a watermaker on the boat is runs at 10 AMPS just to see, I tried to start it with a 2000 watt portable generator. Would not start. We have 8KW generator on boat if we have the 140 AMP 12 volt charger on it drops out when we start the watermaker
 
If you use a portable generator on a boat there are a lot of risks, and you absolutely must learn about all of them and do all you can to mitigate them.
I would call the likelihood of having a serious problem a moderate probability/catastrophic consequences scenario. CO is not the only issue either, there is an electrical shock hazard and fire hazard component as well. Not to be taken lightly.

True, gatherings like the raft-up pic with multiple boats and gennys, and also single boat outings happen frequently without a problem, but the risk is there waiting to strike. Its bad enough if only used in the daytime with everyone awake, but the risk goes up exponentially if you intend to sleep onboard with the genny running - I do not recommend that at all.

If you absolutely must have a generator on your boat, learn about the risks and then become an unyielding Safety-M-Fkr.
I suggest using a Honda EU2200. Get the one with the onboard CO monitor/automatic shutdown feature and Bluetooth with phone app. It will start that AC/heat pump even when using the Eco-throttle setting on the Honda. Running multiple things sometimes requires turning something off while another is running, but its manageable. Make sure your cabin CO alarm is working, and add at least one more inside the cabin-they are cheap.
IMHO the Honda is the gold standard for reliability and worth the extra money.
 
Some times you just have to get straight to the point. I will usually flip my hatch and have the blower on for a little while before start up. Captain has a big responsibility with ANY boat
 
We boat where there are few to no other boats. We carry a 2000 watt generator. In some areas we stop are abandoned docks we place generator on dock and charge batteries. We have 10 six volt and four 12 volt. At a marina it takes 6 plus hours to charge them. The portable generator off the boat burns 1 gallon every 4 hours. The generator on the boat burns 1 gallon an hour. batteries when we sit need charging every second day.
There is place for portable generators. It is on a dock.
 
I understand. I just like to be safe and not sorry.
 
I think that we all know that they're not as safe as a true, built-in marine genny. I doubt anyone would intelligently argue that. And subscribing to the "others do it so it must be safe" argument doesn't cut it. I see others not wearing their seatbelts and they're fine. Heck, I could have not worn my seatbelt since I started driving many years ago and still have been fine. The truth is, there ARE deaths associated with portable genny's - both in the boating world and RV'ing world.

The real question is... CAN it be safe? Well, I suppose that that really comes down to how it's used and how it's monitored. Add alcohol into the mix and the monitoring part definitely starts to taper off.

I think the best thing someone can do is educate themselves on the use/misuse of a portable genny and then make their own decision. As above, just saying "well I see others doing it" is NOT education.

A good place to start is by reading the post that Frank Webster made many years ago in regards to a portable genny.

Alex, as it was pointed out, check the specs on your particular compressor - that will tell you, for sure, the size genny you'd need.
 
I can't seem to find Frank's direct thread link, but I found this re-posted in someone else's thread - although I think there was more in his original thread?

Carbon Monoxide
Is simple to grasp, breath it in a confined space and you don’t wake up. Permanently mounted marine generators have their exhausts plumbed to exit at or very near the waterline and away from closed occupied spaces.


Uncontained Fuel System Vents
The fuel systems on Honda and other portable generators are vented to the atmosphere and their carburetors have a bowl drain that releases fuel inside the generator case. That means where you run it, store it or put it under way will have gasoline fumes released in the area and if the bowl drain leaks, you have raw fuel spilled and an explosive liquid in the compartment with the generator.


Lack of ignition protection on electrical devices
The electrical components on portables are not ignition protected like marine generator electrical components are. This means you could easily have an arc or spark anytime contact opens or closes or whenever something is plugged in ot disconnected.


Lack of Continuous Grounding
Portable generators pose an additional shock hazard since the portable is not grounded to the boat or to a shore side ground. Likely not a problem with a drill or power tool, but if you connect it to your boat's AC system, you have essentially disconnected the green wire.



The USCG governs only boat manufacturers and the manufacturers voluntarily subscribe to ABYC guidelines, so there is no "law" against using portable generators on boats. However, both the USCG and ABYC say using portable generators on boat is a bad idea and regularly caution boaters against it.

In spite of the fact that Honda’s advertising says that boating is a popular use of their generators, They have not addressed the grounding, gas fume and ignition protection issues and those concerns still exist.


If you are one of those who jumped on the CO train and the relatively few deaths attributed to CO, you are not fully considering all the risks of using portable generators on a boat. While accidents may be rare, you do substantially increase your risk of becoming a "statistic" when using a portable generator on a boat.......you put your family unnecessarily at risk when you do.

If you want to test my superficial risk theory, try this: Tell your wife you are buying a portable generator for the boat because it is cheaper and you don’t think the risk of your family not waking up one day was sufficient to require spending the extra money. Also tell her you didn’t bother to consider anything but CO and that you are not ignoring the risks if fire, shock and explosion to your wife and kids.

Let us know how the dog house sleeps………………
 
I can't seem to find Frank's direct thread link, but I found this re-posted in someone else's thread - although I think there was more in his original thread?

Carbon Monoxide
Is simple to grasp, breath it in a confined space and you don’t wake up. Permanently mounted marine generators have their exhausts plumbed to exit at or very near the waterline and away from closed occupied spaces.


Uncontained Fuel System Vents
The fuel systems on Honda and other portable generators are vented to the atmosphere and their carburetors have a bowl drain that releases fuel inside the generator case. That means where you run it, store it or put it under way will have gasoline fumes released in the area and if the bowl drain leaks, you have raw fuel spilled and an explosive liquid in the compartment with the generator.


Lack of ignition protection on electrical devices
The electrical components on portables are not ignition protected like marine generator electrical components are. This means you could easily have an arc or spark anytime contact opens or closes or whenever something is plugged in ot disconnected.


Lack of Continuous Grounding
Portable generators pose an additional shock hazard since the portable is not grounded to the boat or to a shore side ground. Likely not a problem with a drill or power tool, but if you connect it to your boat's AC system, you have essentially disconnected the green wire.



The USCG governs only boat manufacturers and the manufacturers voluntarily subscribe to ABYC guidelines, so there is no "law" against using portable generators on boats. However, both the USCG and ABYC say using portable generators on boat is a bad idea and regularly caution boaters against it.

In spite of the fact that Honda’s advertising says that boating is a popular use of their generators, They have not addressed the grounding, gas fume and ignition protection issues and those concerns still exist.


If you are one of those who jumped on the CO train and the relatively few deaths attributed to CO, you are not fully considering all the risks of using portable generators on a boat. While accidents may be rare, you do substantially increase your risk of becoming a "statistic" when using a portable generator on a boat.......you put your family unnecessarily at risk when you do.

If you want to test my superficial risk theory, try this: Tell your wife you are buying a portable generator for the boat because it is cheaper and you don’t think the risk of your family not waking up one day was sufficient to require spending the extra money. Also tell her you didn’t bother to consider anything but CO and that you are not ignoring the risks if fire, shock and explosion to your wife and kids.

Let us know how the dog house sleeps………………
Quoted just so it appears again.

I’ve never been involved in a CO or portable generator related incident on a boat, but…

I have been involved in being an opinion, looking into a case where a home standby generator killed a person due to improper installation. It is not a game to FAFO.
 
View attachment 152589I was on the St Croix River over the 4th of July and took a video of almost 100 boats all lined up on the beach. 1/2-3/4 of the boats had generators running on their swim platforms. I didn’t hear about anybody dying

The craziest part about this picture is that the boats with the gen's outback look like they all would have onboard generators. Why deal with the hassles of a portable gen when your boat has one onboard? Makes no sense...
 
The craziest part about this picture is that the boats with the gen's outback look like they all would have onboard generators. Why deal with the hassles of a portable gen when your boat has one onboard? Makes no sense...
Their onboard generator died and it’s cheaper to throw a generator on the swim platform than to repair/replace the onboard generator…?
 
Heck, I could have not worn my seatbelt since I started driving many years ago and still have been fine.
This made me chuckle. Way, way back when FL passed the Seat Belt Law I was vehemently against bumper stickers, but did get and sport ONE which is still my favorite.

"I'll Buckle Up when Bundy does . . . IT'S THE LAW!

Well, after a couple years they finally juiced him, so I had to take it off.
Now THAT was some Stray Current ! :D
 

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