No pump out end of season

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by mdolesh, Nov 19, 2022.

  1. 1hot87gt

    1hot87gt Member

    48
    Oct 18, 2022
    Long Island, NY
    2004 Sundancer 300
    5.0’s w/Bravo III outdrives.
    Thank you Lazy Daze on the extensive and informative reply. Actually, I do have a zipper door in my shrink wrap and I’ve been keeping an eye on the boat trying to jump on it once a week to check the damp rid buckets, make sure there are no leaks, no unwanted critters etc. Actually I just about finished my first winter project of converting all the light bulbs in the cockpit, cabin and head to LED.

    I think I did see that small panel you speak of in the head. I guess I will just see if it lights this season. If not, hopefully the Noflex will help. Anyway it’s great to know I have an alternative to just checking it in the bilge with a flashlight. Thank you for the tip.

    And thank you for the words of encouragement. I agree. I’m sure I’ll have a better grasp of the boat after the first season. But from all the systems to the twin engines, it’s definitely intimidating.

    Thanks again and happy holidays
     
    Nater Potater likes this.
  2. dvx216

    dvx216 Well-Known Member SILVER Sponsor

    Feb 1, 2012
    Catawaba Island,Oh.
    2001 340 sundancer 8.1
    8.1s 370 v drv.
    When we had a RV we used it all year round . We would go snow skiing in New York. I would put the pink stuff in the tank but the 6 hour dive home would turn my holding tank into t poop cicle. When we would get home I would slide and old rusted out table top propane grill with the lid on low for a while to thaw it out so I could drain it.
     
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  3. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    You're welcome, GT. That's good that you already have the door.

    Here... I have some fun homework for you... :)

    -- Start by just spending some time in the bilge - take some coffee with you and just sit and look around. Bring some rags and cleaner. By spending some time cleaning, you'll automatically start to get a better understanding of things.

    -- Next, take it ONE system at a time and focus on that. For example, the head. You'll find the holding tank, vacuum pump/vacuum pump and associated lines/hoses/vent filter. Follow the hoses. But again, take your time and focus. Don't worry about anything else. You'll find a hose that goes forward, relatively close to the bilge "shelf" floor. That goes to (actually, comes from) the head. That will connect first to the vac system and then the vac feeds the holding tank. Then you'll see another large hose that goes up to the pump-out fitting. You may/may not have another pump that goes to a seacock on the bilge floor. That's sometimes called a macerator (although it may be a different style of pump called a transfer pump). Some function in the end.

    Well, I don't want to bore you - you probably get the point by now. Enjoy the homework! It really is fun! Well... "I" would call it fun, anyways!
     
  4. 1hot87gt

    1hot87gt Member

    48
    Oct 18, 2022
    Long Island, NY
    2004 Sundancer 300
    5.0’s w/Bravo III outdrives.
    Lazy Daze, that’s a great idea. And actually sounds like a lot of fun. I love mechanical things. I have an old mustang in the garage and there are times during the winter where I’ll just go out there and spend time under the hood, then on my creeper under the car, just going over it. What you’re suggesting is pretty much the same exact thing. I’m also a bit OCD so I’ll also enjoy the time cleaning, and with that, examining everything that is down there. That will definitely help familiarize myself with the various systems.

    Thanks, I don’t drink coffee, but I’ll definitely grab an iced cold beer (or two) and head down there with a few rags, some cleaners and CRC spray, and have at it.

    Enjoy your holiday, and again, thanks.
     
    Nater Potater likes this.
  5. Nater Potater

    Nater Potater Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Oct 19, 2020
    Southwest Idaho
    1992 300DA Sundancer
    Twin Merc Alpha I Gen II I/O's with 5.7 V8's
    'Sounds like me! That's why I do my own car's oil changes so I can check things over. With that mindset, you're going to have a blast with your new boat. I spent two years messing with mine before we had an actual cruise on it, and we're still not quite done (never will be). Check out my build thread for things not to do...
     
    1hot87gt and mrsrobinson like this.
  6. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Me, too - is that a weird thing? I'm going with "no" :)

    GT, if you're using Brakleen, make sure you use the non-chlorinated version. You really don't want to be in an enclosed area with chlorine gas!
     
    1hot87gt and Nater Potater like this.
  7. 1hot87gt

    1hot87gt Member

    48
    Oct 18, 2022
    Long Island, NY
    2004 Sundancer 300
    5.0’s w/Bravo III outdrives.
    No Brakleen. I usually coat most of the engine compartment components with CRC 6-56. Lubricates and protects against rust and corrosion. Used it with much success for years on my last boat.
     

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