58 Sedan Bridge Official Thread

That’s good. With a clean bottom, at 80% load and full fuel, I get 23 1/2 kn at 2000 RPM. As fuel burns off, that goes up 5 kts when I’m at 15% reserve.

I get 2340/2350 at WOT with a 30x32.5 (port) and a 30x32.7 (stbd)
 
Here are the pictures of my sliding door Rod. The first one is with the rod in place, and the second one is with the handle halfway twisted as the rod is retracting.

For @ttmott
 

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Here are the pictures of my sliding door Rod. The first one is with the rod in place, and the second one is with the handle halfway twisted as the rod is retracting.

For @ttmott
Looks similar Carter. I take it that block above the rod is the stop the rod goes into?
Mine doesn't have anything like that.
 
Here are the pictures of my sliding door Rod. The first one is with the rod in place, and the second one is with the handle halfway twisted as the rod is retracting.

Looks similar Carter. I take it that block above the rod is the stop the rod goes into?
Mine doesn't have anything like that.

Ours has neither the rod nor the block.

-Chris
 
Hi all,

New to this forum and new to the 58 model, having just moved up from a 48. I've been reading through some of the posts here and already so helpful. The knowledge posted here from everyone is very impressive.

I'm having an issue with my fresh water tanks that I wanted to ask since I haven't run across any previous posts. Forgive me if I missed them. Having 2 water tanks is new to me and I'm wondering if anyone has had the same problem I'm encountering. I've noticed that when running the water pump, it seems to be drawing down the starboard water tank much faster than the port tank. The port tank will be empty and the starboard tank half full. Once the starboard tank is empty, the pump starts losing it's prime and is sucking air from the starboard tank, rather than drawing down the port tank. If I close the facets and the pump turns off, after some time, the port tank levels off into the starboard tank and I'm good to go again until the starboard tank is empty again. I'm assuming that this is not how it's suppose to work and that the tanks are suppose to draw down at the same levels, but having never dealt with 2 water tanks, I don't know. Has anyone else had this problem and/or is there a solution to resolve this? To make matters worse, the water level indicators are on the port tank, so it takes a long time in between usage to get a decent reading on the real water levels in the tanks. Any thoughts or information on this would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 
New to this forum and new to the 58 model, having just moved up from a 48. I've been reading through some of the posts here and already so helpful. The knowledge posted here from everyone is very impressive.

I'm having an issue with my fresh water tanks that I wanted to ask since I haven't run across any previous posts. Forgive me if I missed them. Having 2 water tanks is new to me and I'm wondering if anyone has had the same problem I'm encountering. I've noticed that when running the water pump, it seems to be drawing down the starboard water tank much faster than the port tank.

Welcome. I can't help with the water issue, though; our water tanks are amidships, logitudinally under the companionway below.

We'd probably all be interested to learn your hull number, given your is from (I think) the last year of 58 DB production.

-Chris
 
My water tanks are in the same location; under the companionway. I forgot to add to my original post and question, that unless the water tank level is high, while running underway, I lose water pressure as the pickups on the tank are facing forward and with the bow of the boat up in the air the water goes to the back of the tank causing the pump to suck air.

As for hull number...interestingly mine does not have DB in it but rather a J, so not sure what number represents the build number. I too believe '13 was the last year year of the 58 DB. I'm curious if anyone knows how many were built that year. I'm told only a handful.

-Brian
 
Hi Brian,

Welcome aboard the forum!

My Dockmate in Cape Coral had the next to the last 58 built in 2013. His name was Michael Collins and he sold that boat about five years ago when he had to move to DC.

I have never experienced your problem with mine, I’m traveling right now, but when I get home, I’ll look at my diagrams - it could be as simple as your crossover tubes are plugged or collapsed.
 
Hi Brian,

Welcome aboard the forum!

My Dockmate in Cape Coral had the next to the last 58 built in 2013. His name was Michael Collins and he sold that boat about five years ago when he had to move to DC.

I have never experienced your problem with mine, I’m traveling right now, but when I get home, I’ll look at my diagrams - it could be as simple as your crossover tubes are plugged or collapsed.
Or if one of the vents are restricted.
 
TROLLING VALVES

Do yours work? Ours seem to. Now. Finally.

We tried trolling for Chesapeake striped bass (aka rockfish) early in the 2022 season, the first since we brought this boat up from Ft. Myers in Summer, 2021. No joy. We need to be moving generally between 2.5-3.0 kts or so, but even on only a single engine with trolling valve on... we were generally running at about 4.5 kts.

Seemed strange. And not really different from having no trolling valves at all. And after a couple attempts to fix it, no joy. Bad lever assembly? Bad controller? Mis-programmed controller? Bad Twin Disc trolling valves (solenoids)?

??

Well recently we finally got the situation squared away. Partly "helped" by an MPC failure... which in turn led to an embarrassing 7 NM tow back to our home marina and a new MPC unit, several bazillion dollars in labor, etc. The symptom was that the gear/throttle assembly wouldn't "take control" of the engines.

At first, our MAN guys thought the failure was just the gear/throttle lever assembly on the bridge. Replaced it, no fixee. Next they discovered that one of the MPC black boxes (inside our starboard "MMDC" cabinet) was apparently a now-failed-again but previously repaired take-out (?) from a 52DB. Replaced it. Lots of programming to follow, eventually with one of the main (German) MAN guys in Pompano on speed dial.

At the end of all that, my guys eventually revisited the trolling valves...

And discovered our trolling valves had been wired "backwards" from the git-go. Meaning when MAN built the engines! In 2006! Within the MPCs, boat positive was wired to trolling valve ground, and boat ground was wired to trolling valve positive.

Apparently none of the previous owners ever tried trolling, and/or never tried to troll slower than about 4.5 kts...

Fishing is only an occasional casual activity for us, mostly used to proof-test the boat in early Spring... but our Golden Rule is that everything on the boat's gotta work... so we've taken another tiny step toward that goal... and at least now we might eventually be able to catch dinner from time to time. At about a bazillion dollars per pound...

-Chris'
 
Chris - i’ve never used mine, I guess because I don’t like the thought of the clutch is “slipping“ to provide the slower speed.

In fact, I’ve even forgotten now, which button you push on the binnacle control to make it go into the trolling mode!
 
Chris - i’ve never used mine, I guess because I don’t like the thought of the clutch is “slipping“ to provide the slower speed.

In fact, I’ve even forgotten now, which button you push on the binnacle control to make it go into the trolling mode!

Yeah, there are pros/cons.

Our GCD guy recommended not using the trolling valves on our Twin Disc gears, but not because of the slippage concept but instead because we don't have gear oil temps/pressures on the monitor display. (And he preferred ZF gears, which have sensors, so no prohibition with those.)

We used the trolling valves in our previous boat -- ZF gears -- a lot, with no sign of abnormal wear. We had no gear oil temps/pressures on those, either.

Kinda similar to engaging Sync, but you start in neutral instead. In neutral, press the troll/sync button (far right). The "Troll" indicator should light up. Once that's lit, engaging a gear/throttle lever past the detente starts with 100% slippage -- gradually decreasing the amount of slippage (increasing speeds) as you move the lever further and further forward.

If you try yours, it'll be interesting to learn if they work or not. :)

-Chris
 

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