Want to overnight - but nervous

If you have your engine batteries turned off and are only running on the house battery then you would be fine even if the house battery died.

As @BlueYonder mentioned, unplug while at the dock and act as if your on the anchor. Perfect way to do a dry run and get your answer(s).

This is a good idea, I think I will try it.
 
We are always spending time on the boat. Remember that is exactly what the emergency start button is for.
Quick story - we are in the Abaco Bahamas sound asleep. Cool breeze is blowing so we opened up the boat and shut down the generator. 3AM and I'm awakened by this loud clicking noise. Ah, I left the dang sonar on - nope. I'm down in the engine room for a couple of hours with my screwdriver stethoscope listening to everything. Drove me crazy for a couple of nights.
Next day we are in Spanish getting fuel and talking to one of the big boat fishermen and mentioned the clicking.
Big belly laugh and he offered a beer, I looked dog tired. Over those beers he said everyone goes through that at night.
It's the shrimp under the boat he explains. Something new every outing I swear.
 
Regarding the anchor slipping, boat moving, etc. My GPS has an alert for this I set once anchored. I think there are other apps and such you can download as well.

Yeah this is just for an inland lake in MN, but I have thought about the anchor slipping. We can usually find pretty shallow anchor spots where scope isn't an issue -- our rode is mostly rope with only about 8 feet of chain which is how previous owner set it up. I think I will set a second anchor off the stern or maybe a second of the bow as back up, but i think we will be ok in light wind. I have been looking for anchor alarm apps for phone, but haven't decided on which one to use.
 
We are always spending time on the boat. Remember that is exactly what the emergency start button is for.
Quick story - we are in the Abaco Bahamas sound asleep. Cool breeze is blowing so we opened up the boat and shut down the generator. 3AM and I'm awakened by this loud clicking noise. Ah, I left the dang sonar on - nope. I'm down in the engine room for a couple of hours with my screwdriver stethoscope listening to everything. Drove me crazy for a couple of nights.
Next day we are in Spanish getting fuel and talking to one of the big boat fishermen and mentioned the clicking.
Big belly laugh and he offered a beer, I looked dog tired. Over those beers he said everyone goes through that at night.
It's the shrimp under the boat he explains. Something new every outing I swear.
Yep, they were cleaning you bottom for you. Fish do it on the Chesapeake.
 
Yeah this is just for an inland lake in MN, but I have thought about the anchor slipping. We can usually find pretty shallow anchor spots where scope isn't an issue -- our rode is mostly rope with only about 8 feet of chain which is how previous owner set it up. I think I will set a second anchor off the stern or maybe a second of the bow as back up, but i think we will be ok in light wind. I have been looking for anchor alarm apps for phone, but haven't decided on which one to use.
I wouldn't get too carried away with multiple anchors unless high currents or impending storm.
There are Apps for your smartphone that will alarm on an anchor drag condition. My favorite was called "Drag Queen" but it isn't supported anymore.
 
+1 to everyone’s input.
Daniel, I was in your shoes 2 years ago and did what Blue Yonder suggested just to put my mind at ease. Didn’t want to be in a cove with the Queen and have to call BoatUS.

But before that…Welcome to the crew and pictures please!
Continue

Friday-Sunday, Shore power off and tried to run the house battery down. Fridge, VacuFlush, water pump, you get it, everything except the macerator. Not a pretty sight anywhere on the lake. I did start the port engine Saturday when the house battery showed 11.5 volts. Never ran the GenSet so as not to bother my dock mates. It’s a great test to get to know your boat.

My setup
Generator
1 deep cycle house battery
2 starting batteries.
Port engine charges it’s starting and the house battery when 120 is not available. (Gen/SP)
Starboard engine charges it’s starting battery.
3 We changed all cabin/cockpit lighting to LED before we tried this.
4 PO did one good thing for me and put in an isolator that keeps the starting batteries from being used for the house load.
5 My batteries are 1yo.

Try it at the dock it will give you good piece of mind. I also carry a jump pack as I’m sure lot’s of others do as well.
My .02
1.jpg
boat.jpg
 
Welcome aboard.

You'll want a rear anchor for over nights and it should be similar in size, rode etc as the primary.

I agree with Pirate in that when I'm on the hook, often for multiple nights, I don't want to hear a generator...just the wind and water.

Get a good cooler, get out there and you'll love it. I love waking up out there and watching people driving by on their way to work.
 
I wouldn't get too carried away with multiple anchors unless high currents or impending storm.
There are Apps for your smartphone that will alarm on an anchor drag condition. My favorite was called "Drag Queen" but it isn't supported anymore.
I'll add - make sure to dog off the line to one or two cleats so you are not relying on the windlass to hold the boat. There is a LOT of discussion on this throughout the Forum.
 
Yeah this is just for an inland lake in MN, but I have thought about the anchor slipping. We can usually find pretty shallow anchor spots where scope isn't an issue -- our rode is mostly rope with only about 8 feet of chain which is how previous owner set it up. I think I will set a second anchor off the stern or maybe a second of the bow as back up, but i think we will be ok in light wind. I have been looking for anchor alarm apps for phone, but haven't decided on which one to use.
When I anchor I also have a stern anchor and line that I use if the cove is sheltered. Being secured front and back keeps the boat from swinging in breeze. Without the stern line, the boat will swing from side to side and when it reaches one side there is a subtle "jolt" that wakes me. With a stern line anchored (or better yet, tied to shore), it holds still. Here is a picture of our typical cove setup. The stern line is actually tied to a cleat, then looped around a shore pin (its in a provincial park where they have shore mooring pins. Going around a tree works too) then back to the boat and tied off. Then when its time to leave, I just untie one end and pull the shore rope back to the boat before pulling the bow anchor with the windlass.
DSC_4223.JPG
 
Geez, tough crowd, I'm still here - Was traveling for work yesterday. First post, didn't realize how responsive the community is. Appreciate everyone's feedback.
Welcome aboard!
You will get a lot of great feedback from many very experienced skippers on this forum.
And a lot of wise cracks too, so just go with the flow…

There is only one hard fast rule:
“No pictures, it didn’t happen.”

So when you do get out there send us some pics. We all enjoy seeing others enjoying their boats.
 
Keep in mind, while double anchors can be good at times, never do this in a mooring field or when other boats are close. The other boats will swing together and you will be odd boat out and the others boats can possibly collide with you.
 
When I anchor I also have a stern anchor and line that I use if the cove is sheltered. Being secured front and back keeps the boat from swinging in breeze. Without the stern line, the boat will swing from side to side and when it reaches one side there is a subtle "jolt" that wakes me. With a stern line anchored (or better yet, tied to shore), it holds still. Here is a picture of our typical cove setup. The stern line is actually tied to a cleat, then looped around a shore pin (its in a provincial park where they have shore mooring pins. Going around a tree works too) then back to the boat and tied off. Then when its time to leave, I just untie one end and pull the shore rope back to the boat before pulling the bow anchor with the windlass.
View attachment 146795

this is good idea, but on our lake, we can't anchor on to the shore for overnights. have to be floating freely in order to camp. thanks!
 
Out of curiosity how deep do you plan to anchor and what is the bottom like?
 
this is good idea, but on our lake, we can't anchor on to the shore for overnights. have to be floating freely in order to camp. thanks!

Your ground tackle will be very important for this. A plow anchor and a lot of chain with good scope will work in most situations. But it will be important to know the depth of the water and what type of bed you will be anchoring in (mud, sand, hard pack, rocks, grass, etc.).
 
Out of curiosity how deep do you plan to anchor and what is the bottom like?

I can find a spot at whatever depth I like. Its a big lake, but there are several protected bays. So depending on wind direction, I'll pick the best bay from there - probably 5-10 feet in depth. the boats draft is over 3 feet. Bottom is sandy with weeds for the most part.
 
I can find a spot at whatever depth I like. Its a big lake, but there are several protected bays. So depending on wind direction, I'll pick the best bay from there - probably 5-10 feet in depth. the boats draft is over 3 feet. Bottom is sandy with weeds for the most part.
You'll be good to go. Sink that anchor, dog off the anchor line to a cleat, turn on your anchor drag alarm and enjoy the evening.
 

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