Removing air conditioning in my 260 Sundancer

Discussion in 'Modifications/Customizations' started by Roland Illvesand, Jan 7, 2020.

  1. Roland Illvesand

    Roland Illvesand Member

    49
    Jan 14, 2019
    Sea Ray 260 SD 2001 Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Here in Sweden you do not need air conditioning so I will remove it and replace it with an 8kw air diesel heater. ;-) Air condition.jpg



    8kw diesel heater.jpg
     
  2. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Question: Is that even safe for installing inside the cabin? Why not just use the heating mode of the AC unit for heat?

    -Kevin
     
  3. ggrimes

    ggrimes New Member

    1
    Sep 1, 2019
    Point Edward, Ontario, Canada
    2006 Sea Ray Sundancer 260DA, 6.2 l Mercruiser, 5 kw Koehler generator.
    Mercruiser 6.2 l with Bravo II drives
    Thanks for posting that pic with the panel removed. I was planning to access my a/c in the spring to check the drain pan and wondered how it would go. Seeing the panel removed and the mounting brackets give me peace of mind when I tackle the removal. Thanks!
     
    Roland Illvesand likes this.
  4. Ididntdoit

    Ididntdoit Well-Known Member

    Dec 5, 2007
    New England & South Florida
    Boatless
    Boatless
    ive been on several boats that have them - same principal as an oil fired home furnace - instant warm heat - the reverse cycle heat really doesnt work as well at water temps below 40 degrees and is hard on the compressor too
     
    Third Edition likes this.
  5. Creekwood

    Creekwood Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 26, 2009
    Oakville and Georgian Bay, Ontario
    '97 330 Sundancer, Raymarine C80 suite with radar, Mercury 310 Hypalon w/8hp Yammie 2stk
    2X 454 carbs w/ vDrives
    Plus the diesel heater can be run without a generator running. I like the idea for that climate, but I would not be installing the heater in the cabin or the bilge. It could go in the cockpit, vented outside, running ducting into the cabin in some way.

    Too bad they don't make a compact diesel powered air conditioner for warmer climates.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
    b_arrington likes this.
  6. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Yes, sounds interesting for cold temps but I would be very concerned about any exhaust leaks into the cabin. I have seen them recommended for RVs but installed out side and ducted in.

    -Kevin
     
  7. Roland Illvesand

    Roland Illvesand Member

    49
    Jan 14, 2019
    Sea Ray 260 SD 2001 Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3

    These panels you need to disassemble to remove the large panel (In total 16 screws).

    2.jpg 3.jpg
    1.jpg
     
    Chris-380 likes this.
  8. Roland Illvesand

    Roland Illvesand Member

    49
    Jan 14, 2019
    Sea Ray 260 SD 2001 Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    I cant use it when im out in the archipelago only when Im connected to shore power.
    99% of my time Im out there.
     
  9. Roland Illvesand

    Roland Illvesand Member

    49
    Jan 14, 2019
    Sea Ray 260 SD 2001 Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    This place is the only one that works. It is not allowed to install the heater or its exhaust pipe in the engine compartment when you have a gasoline Engine.
    I will mount a CO detector close to the heater.
     
  10. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    Rolland, I've seen these used before and they seem like a really good option for some situations. But, as Kevin asked, are they safe for use in a living area (carbon monoxide)? Where that's being installed is still a living area. Plus, the fuel lines are running through a living area.

    Creek... in regards to installing it in a gas engine bilge... albeit without knowing a whole lot about these heater units... I would still think there is some type of heating element that is basically exposed and that would NOT be safe. I do recall someone on here installing one of these a few years ago on his Sundancer (maybe a 330 or 370?), but he installed in the cockpit, under a large seat (plenty of ventilation) so as to avoid both CO in the cabin and combustion problems in the bilge.
     
    Chris-380 likes this.
  11. Roland Illvesand

    Roland Illvesand Member

    49
    Jan 14, 2019
    Sea Ray 260 SD 2001 Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3

    At first I thought about mounting the heater in box # 9 but it is not sealed to the living area and with that I decided to mount the heater where the air conditioning unit has been located.
    I will mount a CO detector close to the heater.


    4.jpg
     
  12. Creekwood

    Creekwood Well-Known Member GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 26, 2009
    Oakville and Georgian Bay, Ontario
    '97 330 Sundancer, Raymarine C80 suite with radar, Mercury 310 Hypalon w/8hp Yammie 2stk
    2X 454 carbs w/ vDrives
    VERY good point. I retracted and re-edited my earlier comment. The cockpit makes more sense. I think it should not be installed in the living space or the bilge.

    The OP is saying he will install it under the bed. I cannot think of a worse place to install a flame producing hot diesel heater than an unventilated place right under a berth. Even ignoring the CO risk, if a fire started in the storage under the bed, there is a huge risk you would not get out alive.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
  13. KevinC

    KevinC Well-Known Member

    Feb 25, 2011
    Long Island, NY
    2004 340 Sundancer
    Twin 8.1 V-drives
    Personally I think the option under the cockpit sink would be a safer choice although if not properly sealed off CO can still get into the closed cabin. I would use many CO detectors in this case. In fact I use 3 on my 340SDA without something like this installed.

    -Kevin
     
  14. Lazy Daze

    Lazy Daze Well-Known Member TECHNICAL Contributor GOLD Sponsor

    Apr 21, 2009
    PA
    Various
    Various
    I've thought about this a few times now. I really think you are playing with fire (no pun intended) by doing this. I don't know if you have kids, but ask yourself this: Would you be comfortable, knowing the risks, with letting your kids sleep down there (both mid-berth v-berth would both be compromised)?

    You're right - under the sink is not really separate all that well from the area you're talking about using. It's pretty much a straight shot from behind the rear (actually stbd), false, undersink cabinet wall to the A/C area. I'm not even sure if that area is big enough with enough clearances? But if it's physically large enough, with a little ingenuity, you could probably seal it off properly to make it safe.

    In reality, there may not be a safe place to put this on this particular model. Possibly the transom locker.

    How are you handling exhaust?
     
  15. Roland Illvesand

    Roland Illvesand Member

    49
    Jan 14, 2019
    Sea Ray 260 SD 2001 Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Mercruiser 5.7 EFI and Bravo 3
    Lazy Daze Thanks for your concern!
    Exhaust pipe will be connected to a through hull fitting (see picture)
    Don’t forget that the heater will blow in 150-200 m3/h fresh air in to the cabin.
    I will check if It’s possible to mount it under the sink cabinet.
    Here is some pictures of heater installation.

    29B5C199-B2E2-48C4-8FB5-C9072D41AA57.jpeg


    DDA4E3AA-EBF5-42AE-8F7E-14854B73F8C0.jpeg

    8F3F3C89-84D4-4E73-94C2-9C682748F756.jpeg

    D8042180-D4D7-44B6-8990-005FA71FF370.jpeg
     

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